“I first learned of Magnús Pálsson’s work while organizing a weekly community radio show during a residency in Seyðisfjörður, Iceland. While preparing an episode on sound poetry, I was searching for some Iceland-based artists, and the first name on every Icelander’s lips, when it came to that medium, was Magnús Pálsson. But for an English speaker whose Icelandic is limited to takk (thanks), it was nearly impossible to find any recordings or audio samples of Pálsson’s work, most of which was in Icelandic and distributed via physical media. I have my own personal fascinations with obscurity, and so this unavailability, intentional or unintentional, was intriguing to me.”

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For the few not familiar with Hildegard Von Bingen, the 11th Century monastic German polymath, her work in sacred monophony far transcends the time in which it was produced and is recommended listening for our current chaotic moment. 

New music from Anenon. Available on February 18 at anenon.bandcamp.com and anywhere that you stream music.






“L-a-s-e-n-i-o-r-a-i-n-d-i-c-a-r-a is a pandemic born project. I was already really interested in time used as a data structure to translate lived spaces into digital spaces, but when the pandemic started, the concept of time became my obsession. All of the sudden, time surrounded me. There was nothing but it. I felt almost like we lost the dimension of space. The world became my little apartment in NYC and my connected screens. I kept thinking about Paul Virilo’s “Open Sky” book, in which he states that in the cyber-connected world we don’t share space but we share time. Electronic synchronicity is what kept us going. A hybrid dimension between space and time where we spent our days. I wanted to make an artwork that could be exhibited in that space, and would strip the historical conditions and geopolitical implications of the nature of that space.”

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“There is a form of accelerationism that tries to offer an alternative to the failures of leftist politics to bring an end to capitalism. At its basic level, this kind of accelerationism argues that to move beyond capitalism we must push through it. Pushing through would mean no regulations; it would mean that we intensify the production of capital and fully embrace real subsumption. The point for accelerationism is that in realizing a pure capitalism, in pushing it to its extreme, we can exhaust it and move beyond capitalism. But what I suggest we actually get in the context of neoliberalism is a kind of accelerationism that wants to speed up capitalism so that life is ordered around competition: a kind of competition for competition’s sake. This kind of neoliberal accelerationism is a nightmarish intensification of capitalist relations as they currently exist”

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