“L-a-s-e-n-i-o-r-a-i-n-d-i-c-a-r-a is a pandemic born project. I was already really interested in time used as a data structure to translate lived spaces into digital spaces, but when the pandemic started, the concept of time became my obsession. All of the sudden, time surrounded me. There was nothing but it. I felt almost like we lost the dimension of space. The world became my little apartment in NYC and my connected screens. I kept thinking about Paul Virilo’s “Open Sky” book, in which he states that in the cyber-connected world we don’t share space but we share time. Electronic synchronicity is what kept us going. A hybrid dimension between space and time where we spent our days. I wanted to make an artwork that could be exhibited in that space, and would strip the historical conditions and geopolitical implications of the nature of that space.”

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“There is a form of accelerationism that tries to offer an alternative to the failures of leftist politics to bring an end to capitalism. At its basic level, this kind of accelerationism argues that to move beyond capitalism we must push through it. Pushing through would mean no regulations; it would mean that we intensify the production of capital and fully embrace real subsumption. The point for accelerationism is that in realizing a pure capitalism, in pushing it to its extreme, we can exhaust it and move beyond capitalism. But what I suggest we actually get in the context of neoliberalism is a kind of accelerationism that wants to speed up capitalism so that life is ordered around competition: a kind of competition for competition’s sake. This kind of neoliberal accelerationism is a nightmarish intensification of capitalist relations as they currently exist”

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All during the month of October 2021, Ben DuVall hosts The Condition of Music every Monday evening at 21:00 GMT, on Seyðisfjörður Community Radio. This is a link to his delightful show, No. 002 “Text 2 Speech”—sound poetry, patterns and beyond.

“That struggle/collaboration between opposites is part of vitality for (Octavia Butler) in nature just as in individuals, and when you don't have that sort of mutuality, all you're left with is something inert and dead. But the other crucial aspect of survival for Butler is that it isn't the same thing as victory or freedom. Because of her place in American society, she saw survival as entailing compromise and filled with a lot of sadness. She viewed survival as necessary even in the face of constraint and pain. Survival is always mixed up with its own opposite, suicide, a recurring threat in nearly all of her novels. Her characters often seem close to simply giving up and allowing themselves to die. So, staying alive in Butler's terms is always about allowing in a certain amount of pain, sometimes as much pain as you can tolerate, even as it makes other sorts of joys possible.”

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thanks to Ben DuVall for the recommendation.